Living Life at Warp Speed



When Dave Marinaccio first published All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Watching Star Trek in 1994, Bill Clinton was the President of the United States, Kurt Cobain committed suicide and Rolling Stone named Green Day’s “Dookie” as best album of the year. In the 23 years since then, the world has rapidly changed. However, the timeless life lessons from Star Trek outlined in the book are still as relevant as ever. Here’s a list of ten great lessons:

1. Humans are imperfect – “…Bounding around the galaxy and discovering other species provides a mirror for looking at ourselves.” (pg.31)

2.  Fear must be accepted, not run from – “The unknown is not to be avoided. It is to be examined, understood and accepted.” (pg. 42)

3. Treat others the way you want to be treated – “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” (pg. 54)

4. There are better topics to discuss than gossip – “Great people talk about ideas. Average people talk about things. Small people talk about people.” (pg. 61)

5. Fear does not make you a successful manager – “A starship captain is no different from a manager at K-Mart or IBM… I admire him as much for what he doesn’t do as for what he does.” (pg. 72)

6. Our country cannot live long and prosper without agreeing on a common future – “Everyone is on the bridge of the Enterprise. Everyone. Kirk the white male, Uhura the black woman, Sulu the Asian, Chekov the enemy Russian, Spock the alien and guest stars of every gender, race and creed.” (pg. 80)

7. Technology changes, people don’t – “How matter how powerful our computers become or how many diseases we learn to cure, we still act dopey.” (pg. 88)

8. Politics is one of the least respected professions – “The idea that anything associated with politics could be correct seems incorrect to me… Certain words just do not go together.” (pg. 89-90)
9. Age is nothing but a number – “…They are putting our concepts of age and aging to the test.” (pg. 108)

10. We define our own purposes in life – “What is the meaning of life? For what purpose are we here?” (pg. 122)